T is for True Blood

Last Sunday’s episode of True Blood, “In the Beginning,” seemed to have a theme of self awareness and identity.

First, we have Eric and Bill, who have been working with the Authority and lying, to some extent, about their feelings toward the mainstreaming agenda. In this episode, they are asked to join the Sanguinista movement, the vampires that believe humans only purpose is to serve as food for vampires, by the authority members who have just overthrown the the authority. Both Eric and Bill are in favor of mainstreaming, although Eric is too manly to admit it. They go to a Sanguinista “meeting” where they are told to drink the blood of Lilith, the first vampire, in hopes that all doubts about the Sanguinista movement will be lost forever. They later go out and eat an entire party of humans with other authority members. With the blood of Lilith inside of them, that party of vampires sees an incarnation of Lilith. They go on eating until Godric’s ghost, Eric’s maker, shows up and reminds him that he knows what he’s doing in wrong. Eric can no longer see Lilith’s incarnation after he sees Godric’s ghost. The episode ends here, so we will see next week how Eric responds to this visitation. The look on his face tells me he’s going to stand up for what he truly believes. That’s the important thing. If you believe it, stand up for it.

In this episode we also see Alcide, a werewolf, training to take over his previously obtained position of pack master, which he turned down in disgust of the pack’s behavior. He decided to take over this position when he found out that the new pack master was doing V, vampire blood, which is a drug to anyone who drinks it. Alcide recently lost someone he cared about because she was on V, so his emotions surrounding the substance are strong. Anyway, his trainer suggests that he take V as well, to level the playing field. Alcide respectfully declines because he’s not willing to take an addictive drug to win a fight. I think this gave an important message to anyone watching, and paying attention to underlying themes, that peer pressure is not something you should give into. Alcide’s fellow werewolves offered and suggested that he take a drug to make him stronger. Knowing the other effects the drug, Alcide stood his ground and just said no.

Third, we see an conversation between Sookie and Sam about whether or not they would change who they are if they were given the chance. Sookie, a faerie, recently found out that if she used up all of her magic, she would become human. She never liked being a faerie in the first place. She talks with Sam, a shape-shifter, who has been experiencing violent discrimination. Sam tells her that he wishes he could say that he would stay they way he is, but he’s so tired of always fighting. Then Sookie makes the point that all the hatred in the world wouldn’t go away, and it would still bother them, even if it wasn’t directed at them.  Sam goes on to say that if he were normal, the world would be a safer place for the people he loves, but we are what we are. I think this scene has a lot of meaning for a lot of people in the world today. Think about it, anything different about you is what makes you, you. If you take that away, would you really be you? And what is normal anyway? Cliche, I know, but it’s true. Everyone has something about them that makes them different. Some people, for reasons beyond my understanding, can’t handle some of the differences other people possess. This causes those people to feel bad about what they are. That’s just upsetting.

Conclusively, you let that freak flag fly, gurl!

)O(

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